A Tree Grows In Brooklyn

Somewhat ironically, this is my first “real-time” (rather than “from the archives”) book review on Lost in a Book. By real-time, I mean that I finished reading the book now, in July of 2010, and am writing and sharing my thoughts on it for the first time ever. Why is this (somewhat) ironic? Because the first book I’m writing about in 2010 has been around since 1943. The book in question is Betty Smith’s much-lauded, semi-autobiographical bildungsroman, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. . . . → Read More: A Tree Grows In Brooklyn

Atonement

One of the most remarkable qualities of Atonement, the decision that the elevates it from the ranks of other moving stories and puts it in the realm of something quite spectacular, is the way that McEwan employs an unusual narrative structure — a narrative structure that becomes a vital component of the narrative itself. . . . → Read More: Atonement

The Time Traveler’s Wife

The Time Traveler’s Wife is easily one of the best books I’ve ever read. And I’ve read a lot of books. In fact, I was so impressed by this book that I was completely floored to learn that it was Niffenegger’s first novel. . . . → Read More: The Time Traveler’s Wife

The Way the Crow Flies

Ann-Marie MacDonald’s The Way the Crow Flies is the first book I’ve read this year* that has earned a spot on the coveted (well, in my own mind) list of “favourite books I’ve read: ever” list. . . . → Read More: The Way the Crow Flies